HomeAcoustic Guitars17 Things to Look for When Buying an Acoustic Guitar

17 Things to Look for When Buying an Acoustic Guitar

If you’re in the market for an acoustic guitar, there are a few things you need to keep in mind.

Obviously, the kind of music you want to play will impact your decision, but there are other factors to consider as well.

This blog post will outline what to look for when buying an acoustic guitar, so you can make the best purchase possible. Stay tuned!

Sound quality

This is the most important factor in deciding which acoustic guitar to buy. You want an instrument that sounds good, no matter what style of music you play.

Some guitars tend to have a “brighter” sound, while others have a more mellow tone. It’s really a matter of personal preference. We have a full list of our recommended best acoustic guitars here.

Action

This refers to how close the strings are to the fretboard. If the action is too high, it will be difficult to press down the strings, and you’ll end up with a lot of “buzzing.” If the action is too low, the strings will be too close to the frets and you may have difficulty playing certain chords.

Durability

Acoustic guitars are made of different materials, such as solid wood, laminate, or composite. Solid wood is the best choice for its superior sound quality, but it is also the most expensive. Laminate or composite guitars are more durable and less expensive, but they don’t have the same rich sound as solid wood guitars.

Brand

There are many well-known brands of acoustic guitars, such as Martin, Gibson, Yamaha, and Taylor. But there are also many good quality guitars made by lesser-known brands.

Wood Type

There are three main types of wood that are used to make acoustic guitars: solid wood, laminate, and composite.

Solid wood is the best choice for its superior sound quality, but it is also the most expensive. Laminate or composite guitars are more durable and less expensive, but they don’t have the same rich sound as solid wood guitars.

Bracing

The bracing of an acoustic guitar affects the sound quality and the projection of the instrument. There are three main types of bracing: X-bracing, ladder bracing, and fan bracing.

X-bracing is the most common type of bracing, and it provides a balance of volume, projection, and tone. Ladder bracing is used on some older guitars, and it provides a brighter sound. Fan bracing is used on classical guitars, and it provides a fuller sound.

Size and Weight

Acoustic guitars come in different sizes and weights. If you are a beginner, you might want to choose a smaller guitar. If you are taller or have larger hands, you might want to choose a larger guitar.

Body Type

There are three main types of acoustic guitars: dreadnought, concert, and parlor.

Dreadnought guitars are the most common type of acoustic guitar. They have a large body and a powerful sound. Concert guitars are smaller than dreadnought guitars, and they have a more delicate sound. Parlor guitars are the smallest type of acoustic guitar, and they have a very intimate sound.

Neck Profile

The neck profile is the shape of the neck. There are three main types of neck profiles: C-shape, V-shape, and U-shape.

C-shaped necks are the most common type of neck profile. They are comfortable to play and work well for all styles of music. V-shaped necks are thicker than C-shaped necks, and they provide more support for the left hand. U-shaped necks are the thickest type of neck profile, and they can be difficult to play if you have small hands.

Fingerboard Material

The fingerboard is the part of the guitar where your fingers rest when you are playing. It is usually made of wood, but some guitars have composite fingerboards.

Wood is the best choice for its superior sound quality, but it is also the most expensive. Rosewood is a common type of wood that is used in most acoustic guitars. On the other hand, composite fingerboards are less expensive, but they don’t have the same rich sound as wood fingerboards.

Price

Acoustic guitars range in price from around $100 to over $5000. You don’t need to spend a lot of money to get a good quality guitar. But if you have the budget, it is worth it to invest in a higher-end instrument.

Size and weight

Acoustic guitars come in different sizes and weights. If you are a beginner, you might want to choose a smaller guitar. If you are taller or have larger hands, you might want to choose a larger guitar.

String gauge

The string gauge is the thickness of the strings. Heavier gauge strings will be louder and have more projection, but they can be harder to play. Lighter gauge strings are easier to play, but they might not have as much volume or projection.

Pickups

Some acoustic guitars come with built-in pickups, which allow you to plug the guitar into an amplifier. If you plan on playing live music, or recording your music, you might want to consider a guitar with pickups.

Finish

Acoustic guitars come in different finishes, such as natural wood, sunburst, or gloss. The finish doesn’t affect the sound of the guitar, but it can be a matter of personal preference.

Accessories Included

When you buy an acoustic guitar, you might want to consider buying a case, a strap, and some extra strings. These are not essential, but they can be helpful in protecting your guitar and making it easier to play.

Case

You want a case that is sturdy and will protect your guitar from the elements and from being bumped around. Hard cases are the best, but they are also the most expensive. Soft cases are less expensive, but they don’t offer as much protection.

String gauge

The string gauge is the thickness of the strings. Heavier gauge strings will be louder and have more projection, but they can be harder to play. Lighter gauge strings are easier to play, but they might not have as much volume or projection.

Conclusion

There are many things to consider when buying an acoustic guitar. The most important thing is to find a guitar that is comfortable for you to play. You also want to consider the size, weight, and body type of the guitar. The wood type, bracing, neck profile, and fingerboard material all affect the sound quality of the guitar. Take your time and try out different guitars until you find one that sounds good and feels right for you.

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We are a team of musicians and music enthusiasts, that aim to provide you with unbiased reviews on a wide range of music gears available online. We offer you sound advice and recommendations on picking the right guitar, accessories, amplifiers, and other music gear based on in-depth research and thorough comparison. Get to know about our review process, or you can meet the team here.

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